Interior Design

The Glass House, by Philip Johnson, in the forests of Connecticut

The Glass House, by Philip Johnson, in the forests of Connecticut

Built at the heart of a forest in Connecticut, United States, the glass house of Philip Johnson is an architectural fantasy that plays with transparency.

And what is true real estate luxury where to live in the most absolute minimalism ? This is the first premise of architect Philip Johnson, who has built a module of stunning simplicity, close to the town of New Canaan in Connecticut. In keeping with the Bauhaus style, it is conceived as a simple metallic structure that supports a series of tall window panes, which replace the usual walls.

Philip Johnson, a glass house in Connecticut

Inside this unique venue, considered as providing national historic interest, volumes showcase an impression of purity. The space is divided by closets in oakwood. A cylinder in brick, off-center in order to break up the symmetry and emerging from the roof, links the floor to the ceiling. It shelters the bathroom and faces the living room, comprising two armchairs and a méridienne, around a table in basic glass. There is an obvious willingness to reduce the amount of furniture to a strict minimum.

The Glass House living room - Connecticut - USA
Ultra zen, the inside enhances the space and light as main values. © DR
The Glass House open kitchen - Connecticut - USA
While nothing appears in the main room, everything is planned to live here permanently. © DR

A space open on nature at the heart of the United States

The interest of the glass house also entails how it opens up onto Mother Nature. Equipped with curtains that hide bright sunlight, the intimacy of the room is preserved from outside elements, while offering a 360° panorama on surrounding nature. A technical and aesthetical feat are the assets of this artistic curiosity that opened its doors to the public in 2007.

The Glass House bedroom - Connecticut - USA
White curtains offer complete intimacy in the bedroom. © DR

Philip Johnson, the visionary of postmodernism