Lifestyle
The royal greenhouses of London’s Kew Gardens

Thirty minutes outside of London’s city centre, the grounds and greenhouses of Kew Gardens are opening their doors once again following renovations.

After five years of extensive work and a budget of €45 millions, the world’s largest greenhouse is once again open to the public. Listed as a UNESCO world heritage site, this symmetrical building is capped with a glass dome and sits proudly amidst a former exotic garden dating back to the sixteenth century. The 121 hectares of the site’s English-style gardens make it the British capital’s green lung.

Kew Gardens : London’s royal greenhouse

Nature lovers and picnickers enjoy the site’s 30 000 plants, flowerbeds, waterfalls, and pond features. There is lots to see, starting with the Palm House. This heated, Victorian-style metal structure is home to a host of tropical plants, including palms and papaya, mango, and banana trees.

Kew Gardens Temperate House - London
On the building’s pediment, capitals decorated with acanthus leaves, cut stone urns, and statues create a striking effect. © DR
Kew Gardens The Hive - London
Inside the Hive, you can learn all there is to know about bees and the important role pollination plays in feeding the planet. © DR

Nature and culture in one fell swoop

Outside the greenhouse, follow the Treetop Walkway, a 200-metre-long bridge, for a bird’s eye view of the urban jungle. Make sure to visit the Hive, too. This sensory-rich experience teaches you about bees inside of a giant 17-metre-high hive. You’ll want to set aside a full day to explore all Kew Gardens has to offer the next time you visit London.

Kew Gardens pagoda - London
At the end of one trail, this Chinese pagoda will sweep you away to a unique and exotic world, in the heart of London. © DR
Kew Gardens Waterlily House - Londres
The leaves of the giant water lily, one of the most popular plants in the park, are so big you can stand on them. © DR

Kew : the magic of a London garden